• Young adults watch on average 12 hours of online video per week so it makes sense that higher education, with a majority of students being young adults, is looking for ways to leverage video.
  • According to recent studies, more than 80% of educators use video in their classes and around half of them are regularly producing their own videos.
  • The problem then comes when looking how to leverage those videos outside the classroom. Until now, much of the video has been a simple press and play where the learner sits passively for an hour, perhaps having to wait for the part that relates to them.
  • However, when the video is broken into chapters that can be searched for the most relevant parts, interactions such as questions can be added and links and other resources can be embedded into the video the engagement and learning outcomes can be radically transformed. And breaking into chapters means that it’s very easy to keep the video up to date by simply replacing a chapter, rather than the whole video becoming irrelevant.
  • The arrival of the video age means that educators can finally be put in control of educating, informing and inspiring online.